Neosho School, Missouri

Neosho School, Missouri

Project partner: Carver Birthplace Association

Drawing of the Neosho School by George Washington Carver as a child.

Drawing of the Neosho School by George Washington Carver as a child.

Scope of Work:

HistoriCorps volunteers worked with field staff to learn new skills and complete tasks including:

  • Removed west elevation non-historic porch and cement patio
  • Removed sidewalk connecting porch to street
  • Removed non-historic lean-to additions
  • Backfilled and regraded former sidewalk, front patio, and lean-to additions
  • Removed non-historic aluminum trim and siding
  • Repaired deteriorated sill plate on east elevation

History:

George Washington Carver

George Washington Carver

The Carver Birthplace Association (CBA) is partnering with HistoriCorps to begin the first phase of restoration work on the Neosho Schoolhouse in Missouri. Built in 1872, the Neosho Schoolhouse operated as a school for 20 years before being used as a residence. The schoolhouse is where George Washington Carver began his formal education that led to him becoming a renowned historical figure.“What the building represents is the initial foundation of all Carver became as a scientist, inventor and more,” said Dr. Luther S. Williams, CBA chairman from Westerville, MO.

The Carver Birthplace Association has raised funds to restore the property to its original condition when it was a schoolhouse from 1872-1890. Luckily, exterior additions added to the schoolhouse when it was a residence have preserved the structure's character.

George Washington Carver was a prominent African-American scientist and inventor. Born into slavery in 1864 in Missouri, Carver had a drive to obtain an education. Carver's quest began in 1876 as he walked eight miles from his birthplace and childhood home in Diamond Grove, Missouri, to attend the 1872 Neosho Colored School. Overcoming many obstacles, his dream became reality in 1894 as the first African American to graduate from Iowa Agriculture College (Iowa State University). Over a 47-year career at Tuskegee Institute (Tuskegee University), Tuskegee, Alabama, Dr. Carver conducted research, taught sustainable agriculture and land conservation, promoted racial cooperation and understanding, and became a symbol of black achievement as he fulfilled his vision to “be of the greatest good to the greatest number of my people.”

 

  • Session 1
    June 14, 2016 - June 19, 2016
  • Session 2
    June 21, 2016 - June 26, 2016
  • Session 3
    June 26, 2016 - July 1, 2016
2017-07-07T13:18:32+00:00 February 25th, 2016|0 Comments

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